Chewy and delicious pomegranate orange molasses cookies marry the flavors of pomegranate, orange, and clove flavors which are the perfect things to spice up your holiday baking! The pomegranate molasses gives these an irresistible texture that is magic in every bite.

Ten crinkly brown cookies lined up in two rows on a white countertop.

Why You Should Make this Recipe

I love pomegranate molasses in savory cooking. Since I always have it on hand, I was inspired to make this cookie recipe. After many tests, I found the perfect balance of flavors and textures in this special twist on molasses cookies.

Soft and chewy cookies are the absolute best, and these pomegranate orange molasses cookies are the perfect combination of sweet and tart flavors. The orange adds a blast of citrus to cut through the sweet, giving the molasses cookies a delicious balanced flavor.

This cookie dough is easy to make and can be made way ahead of time if you need it, as it freezes well and bakes as if it were freshly made. If you’re looking for a fun and unique version of a molasses cookie, you’ve found it! Trust me, they’re seriously addictive.

Ingredients

Ingredients for cookies on a white countertop including pomegranate molasses, orange flavor, and cloves.

pomegranate molasses – Since pomegranate molasses is on the sour side, it is not typically used in baking recipes. Molasses is the primary sweetener in this recipe, and the balance of orange and cloves in this recipe makes the sourness of the pomegranate the perfect pairing.

orange flavor – you can substitute with orange extract. The orange is a necessary element in this recipe. If you leave it out, the flavor of the cookies will not be balanced.

baking soda – this recipe uses baking soda to help spread the cookies. Do not substitute with baking powder.

Step-by-Step Recipe with Photos

With an electric mixer (link opens in new tab) or stand mixer (link opens in new tab), beat 1/4 cup of unsalted butter with 1/4 cup of dark brown sugar until light in color and texture.

A silver stand mixer bowl with butter and sugar beaten together.

Beat in 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil until well mixed.

Scrape the batter down the sides of the bowl. Then add 3 tablespoons of pomegranate molasses and 1 egg. Beat until it is well mixed.

Brown cookie batter in a silver stand mixer bowl.

Sift in 1 cup of all-purpose flour, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, and 1/4 teaspoon salt, mixing in with a spatula halfway through then continuing. Use your hands if necessary.

Cover the dough and chill until firm, about 2 hours.

Beige cookie batter in a stand mixer bowl with a rubber spatula.

Heat the oven to 375°F. If the dough was chilling longer than 2 hours, let it come to room temperature for 30 minutes while the oven preheats.

Measure the dough into tablespoon-size pieces and roll each piece to form 1-inch balls.

Roll the balls in a dish with granulated sugar to coat. Put the balls 2 inches apart on lightly greased cookie sheets or a silicone baking mat (link opens in new tab).

One ball of cookie dough on a blue plate covered in granulated sugar.

Bake until the center surface of the cookies is barely dry, 9 to 10 minutes (don’t overbake). Let cool on the sheets for 5 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack (link opens in new tab) to cool completely.

Balls of cookie dough on a lined baking sheet before and after baking.

These cookies will stay fresh if they are stored and covered at room temperature for 1 week. Once baked, the cookies also freeze well for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator.

If freezing unbaked cookie dough, do so after rolling them into balls but before rolling in sugar. They will freeze well for up to 3 months. Let the dough balls sit at room temperature for 30 minutes, then roll them in granulated sugar and bake as directed.

Several brown crinkly cookies spread out on a white countertop.

More Pomegranate Molasses Recipes

I love cooking with pomegranate molasses. It adds a beautiful sweet and sour flavor profile to any dish. Try it in these awesome recipes.

I love hearing from you! You can also FOLLOW ME on INSTAGRAM, TIKTOK, and PINTEREST to see more delicious food and what I’m up to.

Ten cookies lined up in two rows.

Pomegranate Molasses Cookies

4.78 from 18 votes
Print Recipe Save
Pomegranate, orange, and cloves are the perfect flavors to spice up your holiday baking with these chewy pomegranate orange molasses cookies.
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time10 minutes
Resting Time2 hours
Total Time2 hours 30 minutes
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American, Middle-Eastern
Diet: Kosher, Vegetarian
Servings: 24 cookies
Calories: 67kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour 4.5 oz.
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cloves
  • 2 tsp. orange extract or flavor
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter softened, 2 oz.
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar packed tight
  • 1 Tbs. vegetable oil
  • 3 tbsp pomegranate molasses see notes for store-bought
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup Granulated sugar for rolling

Instructions

(Minimum) 2 Hours Before Baking

  • With an electric mixer, beat the butter and brown sugar until light in color and texture.
  • Beat in the oil until well-mixed.
  • Scrape the batter down the sides of the bowl. Then add the pomegranate molasses, orange extract, and the egg. Beat until well-mixed.
  • Sift in the flour, baking soda, cloves, and salt, mixing in with a spatula halfway through then continuing. Use your hands if necessary.
  • Cover the dough chill until firm, about 2 hours.

To Bake

  • Heat the oven to 375°F. If the dough was chilling longer than 2 hours, let it come to room temperature for 30 minutes while the oven preheats.
  • Measure the dough into tablespoon-size pieces and roll each piece to form 1-inch balls.
  • Roll the balls in a dish with granulated sugar to coat. Put the balls 2 inches apart on lightly greased cookie sheets or a silicone baking mat.
  • Bake until the center surface of the cookies is barely dry, 9 to 10 minutes (don’t overbake).
  • Let cool on the sheets for 5 minutes.
  • Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Notes

Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for 1 week.
You can make the cookie dough and chill it in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 days.
Once baked, the cookies freeze well for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator.
If freezing unbaked cookie dough, do so after rolling them into balls but before rolling in sugar. They will freeze well for up to 3 months. Let the dough balls sit at room temperature for 30 minutes, then roll them in granulated sugar and bake as directed.
Buying store-bought pomegranate molasses is usually less expensive than making your own.

Nutrition

Calories: 67kcal | Carbohydrates: 10g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 12mg | Sodium: 81mg | Potassium: 13mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 69IU | Calcium: 5mg | Iron: 1mg
Did you try this recipe?I’d love to hear what you think! Leave a Review to let us know how it came out, if you have a successful substitution or variation, or anything else.

23 Comments

  1. 1 star
    There’s something majorly off with this recipe. I did it as described and it’s not a dough, it’s a soup. I tried adding more flour (1.5 cups total), and even with that nothing would stick together, it was impossible to roll this into balls even after refrigerating. Too bad, I was really excited about it. Are we sure there is enough flour? All the other recipes I looked at have 2.5+ cups flour, I tried 1.5 and it wasn’t enough. I did try to roll this uber sticky mess into balls and in sugar (the sugar was the only thing that helped them stay together), but then they bubbled up and ran completely in the oven (as expected). Could you maybe check your quantities, to confirm they are correct?

  2. 5 stars
    Made my own pomegranate molasses and wanted to make cookies with it. This recipe is delicious! Cookies are very light and flavorful. Yum!

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