These pan-fried Mashed Potato Latkes use soft mashed potatoes instead of grated potatoes for a perfect crispy-outside soft-inside treat. They truly are the best of both textures! They won’t last long for your Chanukah celebrations, I promise.

Twelve cooked latkes on a wire baking rack.

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

Latkes have an Eastern European origin and are enjoyed by Ashkenazi Jews over Chanukah. I am lucky to be both Ashkenazi and Sephardic so I get to enjoy the best that both sides have to offer!

This recipe gets me even more excited about cooking every Chanukah! It’s my favorite way to make traditional potato latkes, using mashed potato instead of grated potato and pan-frying them. This is ideal if you like a crispy-crunchy outside but soft potato inside.

Ingredients & Substitutions

Ingredients for latkes including potatoes, onion, apple, eggs, matzo meal, oil, and salt.

Russet potatoes – you do not want to use other potatoes because the starchiness of Russet potatoes is what gets the texture of these latkes just right. Sweet potatoes end up too liquidy for the latkes to hold shape.

Matzo meal – This is ground-up matzah. You can pulse the matzah in a food processor, or you can substitute breadcrumbs or panko.

Eggs – are what bind the latkes together. You can also use a smashed-up banana. Other substitutions I have tried don’t work as well.

Oil – Use any flavorless oil that you fry things with. My two go-to oils for this recipe are vegetable and canola. They are all flavorless and inexpensive.

Note: Use the grater plate of your food processor (link opens in new tab) to grate the onion and apple quickly.

How to Make Mashed Potato Latkes

Preheat the oven to 425F and prepare your potatoes.

Poke holes in the potatoes with a fork. Lightly oil them, and season generously with sea salt. Bake for 1 hour.

Seven potatoes on a silver quarter baking sheet next to a fork.

Once the potatoes are cooked, peel them, then mash or mill the potatoes. I prefer using a food mill, but a potato masher or fork works great, too.

Note: I like to use a food mill (link opens in new tab) to mill the potatoes, but you can also use a potato masher or fork. 

Note: Yes, you can use leftover mashed potatoes in this recipe.

In a medium-sized bowl combine the potatoes, grated onion, grated apple, eggs, matzo meal, and salt.

Note: If it is your first time making this recipe, do not add the eggs until after you taste the mixture to see if it has enough salt.

Mashed potatoes, grated apple, matzo meal, and two eggs in a glass bowl on a white countertop.

Heat 1/2″ of canola oil in a non-stick pan or cast iron pan over medium-high heat. Smush 1/3 cup of the mixture in your hands to form a 3-inch diameter patty.

Smush 1/3 cup of the mixture in your hands to form a 3-inch diameter patty.

A ball of potato mixture in a hand and then two hands flattening it into a patty.

Then place in the hot pan. Fry for 3-5 minutes per side until the Latke is golden.  Place them briefly on a wire rack in a 170-degree oven until ready to serve.

A close up of a baked latke on a wire baking rack.

Serve immediately while hot with applesauce, sour cream, fruit compote, herbed yogurt, or creme fraiche.

Note: The latkes don’t taste as good the next day or even after they have cooled. Serve these treats immediately for the best experience.

What to Serve with Latkes

There is a ton of debate over what is the best thing to serve with latkes, and the battle is usually between sour cream and apple sauce. I am an apple sauce fan, but you can also dress these latkes up with sour cream, apple sauce, cream cheese (with chives and herbs), fruit compote, creme fraiche, or Mascarpone (with chives and herbs), herbed Greek yogurt.

Other Chanukah Foods

Anything fried is fair game during Chanukah! Here are some of my favorite Chanukah treats other than these latkes. Be sure to check out all my Jewish recipes here.

I love hearing from you! You can also FOLLOW ME on INSTAGRAM, TIKTOK, and PINTEREST to see more delicious food and what I’m up to.

Twelve cooked latkes on a wire rack.

Mashed Potato Latkes

5 from 5 votes
Print Recipe Save
Pan-fried Potato Latkes use mashed potatoes instead of grated potatoes for the perfect crispy-outside soft-inside Chanukah treat.
Prep Time15 minutes
Cook Time30 minutes
Total Time45 minutes
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: Jewish, polish
Diet: Kosher, Vegetarian
Servings: 4
Calories: 336kcal

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 2.5 lbs. Russet potatoes
  • 1 yellow onion grated
  • 1 Apple grated
  • 1/3 cup matzo meal
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 eggs
  • canola oil for frying

Instructions

  • Preheat to 425F.
  • Poke holes in the potatoes with a fork. Lightly oil. Season generously with salt. Bake for 1 hour.
  • Peel, then mash or mill the potatoes.
  • In a medium-sized bowl combine the potatoes, grated onion, grated apple, eggs, matzo meal, and salt.
  • Heat 1/2" of canola oil in a non-stick pan or cast iron pan over medium-high heat. Smush 1/3 cup of the mixture in your hands to form a 3-inch diameter patty. Then place in the hot pan. Fry for 3-5 minutes per side until the Latke is golden.  Place them briefly on a wire rack in a 170 degree oven until ready to serve.
  • Serve immediately while hot with applesauce, sour cream, fruit compote, herbed yogurt, or creme fraiche.

Notes

Yes, you can use leftover mashed potatoes in this recipe.
You can replace the eggs with 1 smashed, banana. It works great as a vegan binder and adds a great flavor to this recipe.
Use the grater plate of your food processor (link opens in new tab) to grate the onion and apple quickly.
I like to use a food mill (link opens in new tab) to mill the potatoes, but you can also use a potato masher or fork. 
The latkes don’t taste as good the next day or even after they have cooled. Serve these treats immediately for the best experience.

Nutrition

Calories: 336kcal | Carbohydrates: 70g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 82mg | Sodium: 628mg | Potassium: 1314mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 143IU | Vitamin C: 20mg | Calcium: 58mg | Iron: 3mg
Did you try this recipe?I’d love to hear what you think! Leave a Review to let us know how it came out, if you have a successful substitution or variation, or anything else.

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